Acute effects of cocaine on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone, luteinizing hormone and prolactin levels in cocaine-dependent men

Acute Effects of Cocaine on Plasma Adrenocorticotropic Hormone, Luteinizing Hormone and Prolactin Levels in Cocaine-dependent Men. Mendelson, H. H., S. K. Teoh, J. Ellingboe, and E. Rhoades. 263.5 (1992): 505-09.

Abstract

Acute cocaine administration alters secretion of anterior pituitary hormones in experimental animals, and cocaine abuse may compromise neuroendocrine function in humans. The goal of this study was to examine cocaine’s acute effects on neuroendocrine hormones in cocaine-dependent men. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), luteinizing hormone and prolactin levels were measured in 18 men before and after i.v. administration of cocaine (30 mg) or placebo. Each subject served as his own control during the i.v. placebo and cocaine administration conditions. Plasma cocaine levels peaked at 260 ng/ml within 5 min after the i.v. injection. Plasma ACTH levels increased significantly above base-line levels at 5, 15, 30 (P < .01) and 45 min (P < .05) after i.v. cocaine. Plasma luteinizing hormone levels increased significantly above base-line levels at 5 (P < .05) and at 15 min (P < .01) after i.v. cocaine. No changes in plasma ACTH or luteinizing hormone levels were found after i.v. placebo injection. Plasma prolactin levels decreased significantly at 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min (P < .01) after both i.v. cocaine and placebo administration. Cocaine-induced increases in plasma ACTH levels may be due to its effects on dopaminergic systems which modulate corticotropin-releasing factor release in brain.

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