Is Testosterone a Silver Bullet?

Increasing numbers of men are looking to Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) as a way of restoring the glory days. Feeling younger and stronger. Is testosterone a fad or a silver bullet to restoring a man’s health?

There has been a lot of buzz about Low T lately. Commercials, news articles and other media outlets have been spreading the word that Low T contributes to a man feeling tired, depressed, lacking sexual drive and generally…deflated. All this media attention to testosterone has caused men to think more critically about their health. Increasing numbers of men are looking to Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) as a way of restoring the glory days. Feeling younger and stronger. Is testosterone a fad or a silver bullet to restoring a man’s health?

Here are a few facts.

Testosterone makes you feel like superman. A man’s body is chalked full of what are known as androgen receptors. These receptors allow you to make good use of any testosterone (or other anabolic steroid) floating around in your body. Androgen receptors literally put the hair on your chest, strengthen your muscle fibers and activate the manly parts of your brain that crave sex, action and danger. Testosterone makes you feel like a man.

Testosterone levels vary throughout a man’s life. In childhood, they are relatively low. During puberty, they skyrocket reaching a peak in the early 20s. Then slowly, starting in the 30s, testosterone begins to decrease at a rate of about 1% a year on average. Reducing the amount of testosterone available, reduces the effects of testosterone on the body — reduced hair growth, reduced energy, strength, sex drive and even depression. When testosterone gets too low, these effects can become debilitating and general health can be compromised.

TRT offers hope to men who struggle with low testosterone levels. Testosterone replacement can be done via several methods. There are shots, patches and creams with varying dosages of testosterone. Creams offer a daily dose while shots and patches offer concentrated doses that wear off over the course of weeks and months. Men using testosterone feel great.

So is TRT a silver bullet?

While testosterone offers substantial relief from symptoms of low T, it does have some side effects that are worth noting:

The Crash: TRT replaces natural testosterone produced by the body with artificial testosterone received through patch, shot or cream which causes the brain to shut off natural testosterone production. Because of this, most men experience heavy symptoms (fatigue, lack of libido, etc) if they stop TRT, making it a lifelong prescription.

TRT can shrink your balls: What happens to your muscles if you don’t work out…they shrink. Same principle applies the testicle – if the brain doesn’t send the signal to produce natural testosterone the testicles get lazy and start to shrink.

Swimmers go belly up: Sperm need testosterone to mature. Unfortunately, testosterone can’t pass from the body to the testicle. Since TRT turns off natural testosterone production, there is an absence of T in the testicle and sperm fail to mature causing most men to become sterile.

Too much T can kill you: Prolonged periods of elevated testosterone can put men at risk for sudden heart attack or stroke. It is important to keep testosterone in the normal range. Too little can put you at risk for osteoporosis, too much and you could face heart disease or stroke.

What to do?

Is there a way to optimize testosterone production naturally? YES.

Be a man: Awesomely, one thing you can do to boost testosterone is be a man. Studies have shown that testosterone levels are higher when a man is competitive, when his favorite team wins or when he gets a bonus at work

Exercise: Weight-lifting, especially, large muscles like quads, hamstrings and pecs encourages testosterone production. Cardiovascular exercise gets the blood flowing and helps optimize testicular conditions which also supports the production of T

Eat right: Many herbs and nutrients have been shown to support the production of testosterone, while the consumption of sugars and saturated fats are known to decrease it.

Sleep well: Wake up with solid wood after a good night’s rest? There’s a reason for that. Deep sleep cycles allow the body to replenish and repair. Part of that includes boosting testosterone.

Chill out: The stress hormone cortisol is actually made out of testosterone. When a man is stressed out, his body converts testosterone to cortisol, decrease availability of testosterone to the body.

Watch the booze: Alcohol has a dirty little secret. It turns testosterone into estrogen. There is an enzyme known as aromatase which converts testosterone into estrogen. It is produced by fat cells and seems to be increase in the presence of sugar and alcohol.

Bottom Line

Low T is an underdiagnosed condition. TRT can do wonders for men who need it, but not all men need it. There are lots of things men can do to increase testosterone production on their own. A conversation with a well-trained urologist can help men determine how to best improve the quality of their lives by helping them optimize testosterone production.

Learn more.

I was able to interview world renowned urologist Dr. Phil Werthman about testosterone in April at the Fertility Planit show. Watch the above video for the full scoop on TRT.


Sara SDx

Sara SDx

Editor of Don't Cook your Balls, Co-Founder of TrakFertility.com, Health Coach and Men's Health Advocate. Passionate about sperm, men's health and helping people build their families.
Sara SDx

Author: Sara SDx

Editor of Don't Cook your Balls, Co-Founder of TrakFertility.com, Health Coach and Men's Health Advocate. Passionate about sperm, men's health and helping people build their families.

3 thoughts on “Is Testosterone a Silver Bullet?”

  1. I’ve been working to increase my sperm count and motility. While I’m more focused on what I can do to fix, it feels like it would help to narrow down what may have caused my issue to begin with. I definitely did plenty of binge drinking in college, and occasionally, I still do drink a bit too much. Since, I realized my count was low, I’ve dramatically reduced my alcohol intake. That being said, I’m curious – I believe, I’ve mostly seen in context of infertility, heavy drinking affects your testosterone count. I found that my testosterone was fine. Beyond testosterone count, does drinking contribute to infertility in other ways? Thank you.

    1. Need to get back to you on this with more scientifically backed response. I believe from a cursory review that alcohol can directly impact cellular health ie sperm cells. But I need to do more research to understand how and why…

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