Vasectomy reversal might not be as daunting as you might think. In this quick video interview, Dr. Seaman gave us a great run down of what you can expect during the recovery period following a vasectomy reversal.

Day of and Day after

You should expect to take it easy following surgery. Take the day off and chill out on the couch with a bag of peas or maybe treat yourself to a pair of snowballs underwear. Dr Seaman generally advises 24 hours of icing and a day or two off of work (unless you do heavy lifting for your job, then you may need a few extra days, talk to your doctor)

The 2 week check

The tubes inside are a little delicate, so Dr. Seaman recommends for all of his patients to wait 2 weeks before resuming sports, heavy lifting or sex. Extra activity can put stress on the tiny sutures and it is best to give things time to heal. Dr Seaman also recommends that all his guys wear support during the 2 weeks following surgery to help speed recovery. Before giving a green light, Dr. Seaman likes to have a follow up visit with all of his patients to make sure recovery is going well. Typically he is able to lift all activity restrictions after 2 weeks following the surgery.

Making a baby

It can take a few months to re-populate the pipes. Following the two week greenlight, you are free to begin trying for a baby. If you don’t conceive in a few months, it is good to check in sometime around 3-6 months for a semen analysis to make sure that inflammation has gone down and sperm are getting through. Typically men should see full sperm production by six months following surgery, but it can take up to a year to get numbers all the way up.

Sara SDx

Sara SDx

Editor of dontcookyourballs.com and co-founder of Trak Fertility. Interested in all research about men's health, sperm, balls & babymaking. Passionate that we can do better when it comes to male fertility and men's reproductive health.

This doesn't need to be a taboo subject left in a closet, nor do men need to go through this alone. Education and community are key elements to improving health. Don't cook your balls is a space for us to share science and experience advance the state of male reproductive health care.
Sara SDx